How to Become a Web Developer

Posted by admin on Aug 1, 2014 5:11:03 PM

Thinking about a career in web development? Now’s the time to get started! The Bureau of Labor and Statistics predicts that the web development industry will grow by 20%, which is faster than the average for all industries, through 2022. An estimated 28,500 jobs will need to be filled by then. Moreover, the average salary for a web developer in 2012 was $62,500.

So, if you like designing, creating, and an interest in computer programming, web development may be the career for you. Here’s what you can do to get you there:

Typical Web Developer Technical Skills

- Strong knowledge of CSS

- JavaScript

- MySQL

- HTML/HTML5

- Knowledge of native mobile platform

- Java, .NET, PHP, Python (valuable for both front-end and back-end developers to understand)

- Analytical skills

- Software integration

- Photoshop, Gimp, or Fireworks

- Server administration

When the initial design is complete, web developers need to be on hand to maintain and update website.

Web Developer Soft Skills

- Understanding of project processes

- Time management

- Effective communication with team members and clients

- Adaptable to various work environments and working hours

- Ability to translate client requests/ideas into actual, functional design

Education

The typical web developer job requires skills in both graphic design and programming. Training can be done online or through a traditional classroom setting, and both associate and bachelor programs are available (a post-grad master’s is available, too). Depending on which route you’d like to take, you’ll be in training for two to four years.  Or, you can explore the self-taught option by doing online intensive courses, reading books and networking.

Getting a Web Developer Job

The most important tool you’ll need to find a web developer job is a portfolio. Since web development is visual work, you’ll need to create a stellar portfolio to show to prospective employers/clients. If you’re just getting started, first aim to get an internship or an entry-level job that will give you an opportunity to create projects to include in your portfolio. Moreover, you’ll most likely gain team collaboration skills and a taste of what it’s like to work with clients, which will help you answer those tough interview questions.

Once you’ve got your skills up to par and your portfolio all set, start looking! You can also work with a staffing firm to help you get your foot in the door at some of the top companies.

Tell us:  What made you decide to go into web development?

Topics: Technology, Career/Interview Tips

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